Day 21 of Feely’s Halloween Challenge: I present the tale of my local scary legend, Edgar Allen Poe’s inspiration for “The Murder of Marie Roget”.

Sybil’s Cave, is Hoboken’s oldest man-made structure. It was created in 1832 by the Stevens Family as a folly in Elysian Fields, a private park that was located on their property. it became infamous for its association with the murder of Mary Rogers.

On July 25, 1841, Mary Rogers, a New York City cigar girl known for her beauty disappeared. Three days later, her corpse was discovered floating in the Hudson River, near Sybil’s Cave in Hoboken. Theories ranging from gang violence to a botched abortion abound, but the actual cause of death was never determined and the case was never officially solved. Additionally, Rogers’ fiancée was found dead, near Sybil’s Cave, with a bottle of poison a few months after her death. The mysteries abound.

In 1842, Edgar Allan Poe wrote “The Mystery of Marie Rogêt,” a sequel to “The Murders in the Rue Morgue,” the first detective story. The Mystery of Marie Rogêt has Poe’s detective C. Auguste Dupin solving the murder of the titular calendar, which in Law & Order parlance was ripped from the headlines. Poe potentially learned about the murder while visiting John Jacob Astor’s Villa, located in Hoboken.

Poe attempted to get his story published by framing his story as entering “into a very rigorous analysis of the real tragedy in New York.” while simultaneously transporting the setting to Paris. The first installment of “The Mystery of Marie Rogêt” was published in November 1842. By the end of the month, new theories surrounding the real murder emerged. As a result, Poe changed his story to mirror the new found facts. In 2007, the City of Hoboken cleaned up and restored Sybil’s Cave and visitors are once again greeted by the cave’s stone arch entry.

http://untappedcities.com/2014/01/17/edgar-allan-poe-and-the-murder-near-cybils-cave-in-hoboken/

feely's halloween challenge Poe

doctorwhoforlife:

lesreichenbachfinn:

feardubh:

When people turn to fictional characters, it’s often because they want an escape. The stories of these people shelter us from the storm of our daily lives; they save us, if only for a little while. But when we really give in, become invested, let ourselves be vulnerable, something changes. We begin to feel that we know them. It’s no longer just an escape, but part of us, something that makes us who we are.

These characters teach us that incredible adversity can be overcome. That people can love each other forever. That life can be an adventure. That magic can be real. And even if these miracles have never happened to us, we begin to go through life believing that, someday, they could.

“And I promise you that you’re important. Don’t look at me like that- in all my 900 years I’ve never met someone who wasn’t important.”

“Cheer up mate, it gets better. Look at me, I was once a little kid living under the stairs. You’ll do fine.”

“Hey. I know it seems like life sucks, that you’ve got the devil on your tail. Hell, sometimes you do. But you’re strong enough to beat him. You’ve got friends at your back and family too, and that’s what really counts in the end.”

“Don’t be silly, they’re wrong about you; of course you matter. You’ve always mattered.”

WOW CONGRATS YOU JUST MADE ME CRY OVER MY OWN POST

ohhhh its back <3 this makes me so happy!!!!

(Source: romangodfrey, via ophelia-tagloff)